Face-Book-Setup-01

Tuesday, 03 March 2015 23:13

BURUNDI

Rate this item
(0 votes)

POPULATION : 8,749,000
AREA : 27,834 SQ KM
CAPITAL : BUJUMBURA

At a glance

Politics: Stability appeared to be within reach after years of bloody conflict, but post-election tension in 2010 has renewed fears of civil war
Economy: Half the population lives below the poverty line. Coffee and tea account for most of the foreign currency earnings
International: The conflict in neighbouring DRCongo provides emerging rebel groups with room to plan attacks


Burundi, one of the world's poorest nations, is struggling to emerge from a 12-year, ethnic-based civil war.

Since independence in 1962 it has been plagued by tension between the usually-dominant Tutsi minority and the Hutu majority.

The ethnic violence sparked off in 1994 made Burundi the scene of one of Africa's most intractable conflicts.

It began to reap the dividends of a peace process, but faces the formidable tasks of reviving a shattered economy and forging national unity.

Boatmen on Lake Tanganyika, Burundi
Burundi lies on Lake Tanganyika, the world's longest freshwater lake
In 1993 Burundi seemed poised to enter a new era when, in their first democratic elections, Burundians chose their first Hutu head of state, Melchior Ndadaye, and a parliament dominated by the Hutu Front for Democracy in Burundi (Frodebu) party.

But within months Ndadaye had been assassinated, setting the scene for years of Hutu-Tutsi violence in which an estimated 300,000 people, most of them civilians, were killed.

In early 1994 parliament elected another Hutu, Cyprien Ntaryamira, as president. But he was killed in April alongside the president of neighbouring Rwanda when the plane they were travelling in was shot down over Kigali.

Power sharing
Another Hutu, Sylvestre Ntibantunganya, was appointed president in October 1994. But within months, the mainly Tutsi Union for National Progress (Uprona) party withdrew from the government and parliament, sparking a new wave of ethnic violence.

Following long-running talks, mediated by South Africa, a power-sharing government was set up in 2001 and most of the rebel groups agreed to a ceasefire. Four years later Burundians voted in the first parliamentary elections since the start of the civil war.

The main Hutu former rebel group won the vote and nominated its leader Pierre Nkurunziza as president.

The government and the United Nations embarked on the lengthy process of disarming thousands of soldiers and former rebels, as well as forming a new national army, but the authoritarian behaviour of the government following disputed elections in 2010 has cast a shadow over the reconciliation process.

With the opposition accusing President Nkurunziza of seeking to rewrite the constitution for his party's own gain and of behaving increasingly like a dictator, there were fears of a new wave of unrest ahead of a presidential election scheduled for 2015.

 

TOP BURUNDI NEWSPAPERS & NEWS SITES

1 IWACU
2 BURUNDITRANSPARENCE.ORG
3 BUJUMBURA NEWS
4 BURUNDI R?ALIT
5 ARIB
6 BURUNDI INFORMATION
7 RSF BONESHA FM
8 RTNB
9 RADIO ISANGANIRO
10 GAHUZA

Read 571 times Last modified on Friday, 06 March 2015 23:03
More in this category: « BURKINA FASO CAMEROON »
There are 29826 listings and 878 categories in our website

Call us

For Business Promotions - +94 777 200 670