Sri Lanka

Tuesday, 21 July 2015 00:00

Plumb truths of lovilovi plum

aFor it was in Madagascar, the large Indian Ocean island on the southeast coast of Africa, that the Flacourtia indica or the Governor's Plum-a species of a flowering plant native to much of Africa-found a prosperous home. From this bio diverse hot spot, where 90 percent of its plants and animals are endemic, arose the Flacourtia to bloom, flower and fruit and then spread its genes throughout the tropical and temperate parts of the Asian region including fertile Sri Lanka.

Ascending the highlands, mountain breeze fanned our faces beckoning us to our destination -Nuwara Eliya, the mountainous patch of the country with its English charms, standing 1,890 metres above sea level (5,800 feet). Passing the cascading falls and pristine mountains layered in lush green tea estates; little by little we were progressing to Nuwara Eliya.

Monday, 20 July 2015 23:55

Lankan Guava Goes For Gold

It's the fruit Mexico gifted to the world. The two to five inch long round or oval bundle of white or red flesh, gift wrapped in a thick hide of green that soon caught the people's imagination and tickled their taste buds when the conquistadors introduced it to the rest of the world. And five hundred years later, Sri Lanka too has started to multiply the guava joy by creating its own varieties to meet the needs of the new millennium.

The mountainous destination hub ‘Nuwara Eliya', trespassed by many wildlife seekers as it is in the heart of the hill country, provides easy access and lodging conveniences to reach world renowned wildlife destinations such as the Horton Plains and Sri Pada.

The mountainous destination hub ‘Nuwara Eliya', trespassed by many wildlife seekers as it is in the heart of the hill country, provides easy access and lodging conveniences to reach world renowned wildlife destinations such as the Horton Plains and Sri Pada.

Monday, 20 July 2015 23:47

The Buzz About Honeybees

The giant honeybees of Sigriya have a formidable reputation. Inhabitants of the huge hives that cling high on the walls of the 1,500 year old fortress of the King Kasyapa I (AD477-495), have a particularly fierce disposition. Their reputation for sending visitors fleeing has given rise to local legend that they are reincarnations of the King's warriors.

The pouring rain seemed persistent in impeding our passage over a jagged rock surface. Stepping on uncertain ground streaming with water, there was a silent resolve to conquer the circumstances to appreciate the splendour and solemnity of a long-gone Sri Lankan story.The journey was reminiscent of an era where holy men of this land would have similarly traversed rough terrain; encountering rain, wild animals and invaders, to meditate, tutor and learn. The ancient Thanthirimale Temple in Anuradhapura is spread across, closely located rock surfaces surrounded by dense jungle. Located 40 kilometres north-west to the city of Anuradhapura, the temple ground extending across 250 acres of land is renowned for its many caves, inscriptions, rock carvings, ruins of monastic residences, meditation chambers, a library and the Sacred Bodhi tree. Thanthirimale is shrouded in beauty and a rich historyof fact and fable.

Standing majestically amidst a flat terrain with a few peaks rising up from a veil of thick mist, drenched in the rays of the morning light ‘Dombagaskanda’, is a wild hideaway from the bustling world outside. Despite its location, the amazing wildlife trapped here is unimaginable. Positioned at the heart of the forest is a hermitage which has been there from way back in time, from the early 1950’s. This is the closest tropical rain forest that can be reached from the main city of Colombo.

Monday, 20 July 2015 23:40

Bundala National Park

The southeastern coast of Sri Lanka is an area of rugged and rustic beauty. In contrast to the stereotypical tropical beach of calm seas, sheltered coves and swaying palms, this is a harsher yet equally beautiful land of windswept sand dunes and barrier beaches pounded by monsoon storms.

Monday, 20 July 2015 23:38

Around Kalpitiya

Kalpitiya, bordered by the Puttalam lagoon on one side and the Indian Ocean on the other, is a remarkable travel destination that has become a favourite go to place among not only locals but tourists who visit the Island. With a history that spans across centuries, Kalpitiya was once a stronghold of the Portuguese and then the Dutch during colonial times. As the Kalpitiya peninsula had-according to historians-gained an unprecedented reputation for maritime trade during ancient times, the colonial powers, especially the Dutch, established a military garrison to conduct trade. The Dutch Fort at the centre of the town with its red bricked walls rising to a magnificent height serves as a testament to their one time presence in the peninsula.

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Images of Ceylon

Sri Lanka In Brief

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Sri Lanka in Brief

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