World News

President Donald Trump has warned North Korea to expect "big, big trouble" if anything happens to the US territory of Guam.President Donald Trump has warned North Korea to expect "big, big trouble" if anything happens to the US territory of Guam.Speaking at his Bedminister, New Jersey golf resort, he promised the territory would be "very safe, believe me".Mr Trump said the US could impose further sanctions, "as strong as they get", on North Korea.He said he would speak to Chinese President Xi Jinping on Friday evening about the "very dangerous" situation."Hopefully, it will all work out," Mr Trump said, striking an upbeat tone after a day of rhetorical brinkmanship."Nobody loves a peaceful solution better than President Trump, that I can tell you."Earlier on Friday, the president said the US military was "locked and loaded" to deal with North Korea, should the need arise."Military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded, should North Korea act unwisely. Hopefully Kim Jong-un will find another path!" he tweeted.He spoke as Pyongyang accused him of "driving" the Korean peninsula to the "brink of a nuclear war".

US President Donald Trump has thanked Russian President Vladimir Putin for ordering the departure of 755 staff from US diplomatic missions.US President Donald Trump has thanked Russian President Vladimir Putin for ordering the departure of 755 staff from US diplomatic missions.

President Donald Trump has warned North Korea it should be "very, very nervous" if it does anything to the US.President Donald Trump has warned North Korea it should be "very, very nervous" if it does anything to the US.He said the regime would be in trouble "like few nations have ever been" if they do not "get their act together".His comments came after Pyongyang announced it had a plan to fire four missiles near the US territory of Guam.Tensions between the two countries have escalated in recent weeks after North Korea tested two intercontinental ballistic missiles in July.The UN recently approved further economic sanctions against Pyongyang as a result of its nuclear weapons programme.President Trump also said he was close to revealing his keenly awaited decision on the number of troops he plans to keep in Afghanistan.He said he had "taken over a mess", but was going to make it "a lot less messy".

At least 29 teenage migrants were deliberately drowned by a people smuggler in Yemen, the UN's migration agency says.At least 29 teenage migrants were deliberately drowned by a people smuggler in Yemen, the UN's migration agency says.They were among 120 people who were deliberately pushed from a boat into the sea by the smuggler who apparently feared arrest.Some 27 survivors were found on a beach by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) on a routine patrol.

U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Wednesday that North Korea risks annihilation if it starts a war, and he told Pyongyang it must end its pursuit of nuclear weaponry.U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Wednesday that North Korea risks annihilation if it starts a war, and he told Pyongyang it must end its pursuit of nuclear weaponry.

An earthquake has killed at least five people and injured more than 60 in China's south-western province of Sichuan, officials say.An earthquake has killed at least five people and injured more than 60 in China's south-western province of Sichuan, officials say.The 6.5-magnitude quake struck in the sparsely-populated north of Sichuan, the US Geological Survey said.Some reports suggest the death toll could be much higher. The epicentre was close to an area popular with tourists.Sichuan province is prone to earthquakes. More than 70,000 people were killed in a quake in 2008.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday issued a stark warning to North Korea, saying it "best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen."U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday issued a stark warning to North Korea, saying it "best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen."
Trump, speaking to reporters at his private golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, accused North Korean leader Kim Jong Un of having been "very threatening." Trump then repeated his warning that the impoverished country faced "fire, fury and frankly power the likes of which the world has never seen before."
The president's remarks came hours after several media reports said the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency concluded last month that North Korea had successfully built a miniaturized nuclear warhead it could fit inside its missiles.
Other experts have said in recent months that such an advancement by Pyongyang, in its pursuit to become the world's ninth full-fledged nuclear power, was probably years away.
The Washington Post quoted the defense agency's assessment that "North Korea has produced nuclear weapons for ballistic missile delivery, to include delivery" by intercontinental ballistic missiles. North Korea has said in recent days that the ICBM it tested in a launch last month was capable of hitting the U.S. mainland, an advance it had not previously claimed.
Trump's forceful language Tuesday, rivaling that frequently heard from Pyongyang, is certain to prompt concern that war could resume on the Korean Peninsula, where three years of combat in the early 1950s ended in stalemate.
"What the last 60 years, since the Korean War ended in an armistice, has shown is that a war of words does not translate into real war," said Balbina Hwang, a Georgetown University adjunct assistant professor. "The increase in rhetoric does raise existing tensions, but it does not translate into a shift of U.S. policy or strategy on North Korea."
"I think a number of observers' fear on this issue, and on a number of issues in this administration, is that perhaps there wasn't a careful consideration of the words of our commander in chief in this instance," said David Pressman, a former deputy U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. "If ever there was a topic on which we need to be extremely precise, it's nuclear proliferation when dealing with someone who is as unpredictable as Kim Jong Un."
People watch a news broadcast about a missile launch in Pyongyang, North Korea, July 29, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un says the second flight test of an intercontinental ballistic missile demonstrated his country can hit the U.S. mainland.People watch a news broadcast about a missile launch in Pyongyang, North Korea, July 29, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un says the second flight test of an intercontinental ballistic missile demonstrated his country can hit the U.S. mainland.'Proud nuclear state'
It is not known whether North Korea has tested a smaller nuclear warhead, although it said last year that it had. After one successful long-range missile test in July, state media declared North Korea as a "proud nuclear state" with an ICBM rocket "that can now target anywhere in the world."
Media reports Tuesday, referencing the DIA report, said the intelligence agency concluded Pyongyang had now amassed 60 nuclear weapons, although some experts think the number is smaller, perhaps half that.
"The U.S. government has not been able to have reliable, confirmable, accurate intelligence about North Korean military assets for decades, so it's all speculation," Hwang, a former U.S. State Department adviser on North Korea, told VOA. "It could possibly be true or not necessarily accurate."
The United States early last year concluded that Pyongyang was struggling to build intercontinental ballistic missiles, but even then assumed that it would eventually be able to produce them and have nuclear-armed missiles capable of reaching all of its adversaries.
FILE - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacts with scientists and technicians of the DPRK Academy of Defense Science after the test-launch of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency in Pyongyang, July 5, 2017.FILE - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacts with scientists and technicians of the DPRK Academy of Defense Science after the test-launch of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency in Pyongyang, July 5, 2017.The DIA's reported conclusion comes as the United States and other world powers have focused new attention on North Korea's military ambitions. The U.N. Security Council unanimously imposed new sanctions on Pyongyang on Sunday in an effort to cut $1 billion of its $3 billion in annual export income.
Trump, earlier Tuesday on Twitter, commended the international community for confronting North Korea over its nuclear weapons development, even as his U.N. envoy said she was skeptical that the latest sanctions would deter Pyongyang.
Trump, on what he calls a working vacation at his resort in New Jersey, said in a Twitter comment, "After many years of failure, countries are coming together to finally address the dangers posed by North Korea. We must be tough & decisive!"
But U.S. Representative Eliot Engel of New York, the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said Trump pushed too far with his "fire and fury" comment.
"President Trump has again undermined American credibility by drawing an absurd red line," he said. "North Korea is a real threat, but the president's unhinged reaction suggests he might consider using American nuclear weapons in response to a nasty comment from a North Korean despot."
'Very strong message'
Trump's U.N. ambassador, Nikki Haley, told NBC's Today program that the newest U.N. sanctions were not "going to stop our North Korea problem." Nonetheless, she said the penalties would "send a very strong message."

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta has appealed for calm in a televised speech on the eve of the country's general election.Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta has appealed for calm in a televised speech on the eve of the country's general election.He urged the 19 million registered voters to turn out in great numbers, but to "do so in peace".The contest pits Mr Kenyatta against his long-time rival, Raila Odinga, and is seen as too close to call.The final week of campaigning has been marred by the murder of a top election official and claims of vote-rigging.Mr Kenyatta, the 55-year-old son of Kenya's founding president, is seeking a second and final term in office.Observers say the leading candidates have both avoided inflammatory speeches as polling day draws closer. In 2007 more than 1,100 Kenyans died and 600,000 were displaced after a disputed election - an outcome neither side wants to see repeated."After you cast your ballot, please go home," Mr Kenyatta said on Monday."Go back to your neighbour. Regardless of where he or she comes from, their tribe, their colour or their religion. Shake their hand, share a meal and tell them 'let us wait for the results,' for Kenya will be here long after this general election."

North Korea vowed Monday to persist in its nuclear weapons development program, rejecting calls from the international community to rein in its aggressive military actions.North Korea vowed Monday to persist in its nuclear weapons development program, rejecting calls from the international community to rein in its aggressive military actions.

At least 50 civilians have been killed by militants in northern Afghanistan, officials say.At least 50 civilians have been killed by militants in northern Afghanistan, officials say.

World News

Latest World News

There are 29901 listings and 879 categories in our website

Call us

For Business Promotions - +94 777 200 670